Publication 525 (2017), Taxable and Nontaxable Income

Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account. This is a new type of savings account for individuals with disabilities and their families.

You must report this amount on Form Austrian Investing in a Distorted World.

Latest News Videos

ASUS Support Center helps you to downloads Drivers, Manuals, Firmware, Software; find FAQ and Troubleshooting.

Add a tap hole to existing lugs! Search switchboard, switchgear, and panelboard lugs. Available with NEMA standard bolt size mounting holes and spacing. Click for a comparison between panelboards, switchboards, and switchgears. Click here to shop available stock.

Prevents accidental wire penetration making direct contact with components on the PCB behind the terminal. Click here to view product information. IHI multiple wire lugs enable dual wires of stranding class B and C wires to be mounted in one wire hole. When using fine stranded wires and cables one wire per hole is permitted. See individual parts for details.

Not all parts are approved for multiple wires per barrel. Click here for more information on UL standards for stacking lugs in installations.

Step files are now available for all International Hydraulics parts. Aluminum, tin-plated mechanical connectors with turn prevent rib or multiple mounting bolt holes for anti-rotation. Click Here to Shop Available Stock. New multi-purpose, compact, 3-tier, V, V, multi-wire power and ground and neutral lug for panel builders ULA.

Bus mounted or optional insulated stand-off mounted, SA1. Optional standoffs insulators for wide range of QEUY2 rated voltages. Slotted steel zinc plated binding screws for universal screwdriver availability. Hex socket kcmil line wire binding screw for ease of torquing large wires. Optional hex socket load screws. Flex Wire Cable Adapters. Made in the USA from domestic and imported parts. Click link for FAQ and caveats on use of fine stranded wire.

Tin plated aluminum lugs are of mechanical screw type for reusability and freedom from special crimping tools. Always in stock, shipped direct to you, fast and reliable service.

Made in the USA for quality you can depend on. Current carrying and grounding use. Only one low shipping charge added. Los precios de descuento para cualquier cantidad. We accept the following forms of online payment: For the same great prices outside of the USA please click here for shipping cost. Para los gran mismos precios fuera de los EEUU hace clic por favor aquí para enviar el costo. If you babysit for relatives or neighborhood children, whether on a regular basis or only periodically, the rules for childcare providers apply to you.

Whether you are an employee or self-employed person, your income could be subject to self-employment tax. If you filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code, you must allocate your wages and withheld income tax. Your W-2 will show your total wages and withheld income tax for the year.

On your tax return, you report the wages and withheld income tax for the period before you filed for bankruptcy. Your bankruptcy estate reports the wages and withheld income tax for the period after you filed for bankruptcy. If you receive other information returns such as Form DIV, or INT that report gross income to you, rather than to the bankruptcy estate, you must allocate that income.

The only exception is for purposes of figuring your self-employment tax, if you are self-employed. For that purpose, you must take into account all your self-employment income for the year from services performed both before and after the beginning of the case. You must file a statement with your income tax return stating you filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy case. The statement must show the allocation and describe the method used to make the allocation. For a sample of this statement and other information, see Notice , I.

This section discusses many types of employee compensation. The subjects are arranged in alphabetical order. If you receive advance commissions or other amounts for services to be performed in the future and you are a cash-method taxpayer, you must include these amounts in your income in the year you receive them.

If you repay unearned commissions or other amounts in the same year you receive them, reduce the amount included in your income by the repayment. If you repay them in a later tax year, you can deduct the repayment as an itemized deduction on your Schedule A Form , or you may be able to take a credit for that year.

See Repayments , later. If you receive travel, transportation, or other business expense allowances or reimbursements from your employer, see Pub. If you are reimbursed for moving expenses, see Pub. Include in income amounts you are awarded in a settlement or judgment for back pay. These include payments made to you for damages, unpaid life insurance premiums, and unpaid health insurance premiums.

They should be reported to you by your employer on Form W Bonuses or awards you receive for outstanding work are included in your income and should be shown on your Form W These include prizes such as vacation trips for meeting sales goals.

If the prize or award you receive is goods or services, you must include the fair market value of the goods or services in your income. If you receive tangible personal property other than cash, a gift certificate, or an equivalent item as an award for length of service or safety achievement, you generally can exclude its value from your income.

Your employer can tell you whether your award is a qualified plan award. A length-of-service award if you received it for less than 5 years of service or if you received another length-of-service award during the year or the previous 4 years. Ben Green received three employee achievement awards during the year: Assuming that the requirements for qualified plan awards are otherwise satisfied, each award by itself would be excluded from income.

This is any payment made by an employer to an individual for any period during which the individual is, for a period of more than 30 days, an active duty member of the uniformed services and represents all or a portion of the wages the individual would have received from the employer for that period. The payments are reported as wages on Form W Most payments received by U. Government civilian employees for working abroad are taxable.

However, certain cost-of-living allowances are tax free. Your employer will report to you the total amount of deferrals for the year under a nonqualified deferred compensation plan. This amount is shown on Form W-2, box 12, using code Y. This amount is included in your wages shown on Form W-2, box 1. It is also shown on Form W-2, box 12, using code Z.

Nonqualified deferred compensation plans of nonqualified entities. In most cases, any compensation deferred under a nonqualified deferred compensation plan of a nonqualified entity is included in gross income when there is no substantial risk of forfeiture of the rights to such compensation. For this purpose, a nonqualified entity is: Effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business in the United States, or.

A partnership unless substantially all of its income is allocated to persons other than: If your employer gives you a secured note as payment for your services, you must include the fair market value usually the discount value of the note in your income for the year you receive it.

When you later receive payments on the note, a proportionate part of each payment is the recovery of the fair market value that you previously included in your income. Do not include that part again in your income. Include the rest of the payment in your income in the year of payment. If your employer gives you a nonnegotiable unsecured note as payment for your services, payments on the note that are credited toward the principal amount of the note are compensation income when you receive them.

You must include in income amounts you receive as severance pay and any payment for the cancellation of your employment contract. Severance payments are subject to social security and Medicare taxes, income tax withholding, and FUTA tax. Severance payments are wages subject to social security and Medicare taxes.

As noted in section 15 of Pub. If you are a federal employee and receive a lump-sum payment for accrued annual leave when you retire or resign, this amount will be included as wages on your Form W If you resign from one agency and are reemployed by another agency, you may have to repay part of your lump-sum annual leave payment to the second agency. You can reduce gross wages by the amount you repaid in the same tax year in which you received it.

Attach to your tax return a copy of the receipt or statement given to you by the agency you repaid to explain the difference between the wages on your return and the wages on your Forms W If you choose to accept a reduced amount of severance pay so that you can receive outplacement services such as training in résumé writing and interview techniques , you must include the unreduced amount of the severance pay in income.

Pay you receive from your employer while you are sick or injured is part of your salary or wages. In addition, you must include in your income sick pay benefits received from any of the following payers. If you and your employer have an agreement that your employer pays your social security and Medicare taxes without deducting them from your gross wages, you must report the amount of tax paid for you as taxable wages on your tax return.

The payment is also treated as wages for figuring your social security and Medicare taxes and your social security and Medicare benefits. Do not include a stock appreciation right granted by your employer in income until you exercise use the right. When you use the right, you are entitled to a cash payment equal to the fair market value of the corporation's stock on the date of use minus the fair market value on the date the right was granted.

You include the cash payment in income in the year you use the right. If your employer gives you virtual currency such as Bitcoin as payment for your services, you must include the fair market value of the currency in your income. Notice , I. Fringe benefits received in connection with the performance of your services are included in your income as compensation unless you pay fair market value for them or they are specifically excluded by law.

Abstaining from the performance of services for example, under a covenant not to compete is treated as the performance of services for purposes of these rules.

See Valuation of Fringe Benefits , later in this discussion, for information on how to determine the amount to include in income. You are the recipient of a fringe benefit if you perform the services for which the fringe benefit is provided. You are considered to be the recipient even if it is given to another person, such as a member of your family. An example is a car your employer gives to your spouse for services you perform. The car is considered to have been provided to you and not to your spouse.

If you are a partner, director, or independent contractor, you also can be the recipient of a fringe benefit. Your employer or another person for whom you perform services is the provider of a fringe benefit regardless of whether that person actually provides the fringe benefit to you. The provider can be a client or customer of an independent contractor. You must use the same accounting period your employer uses to report your taxable noncash fringe benefits.

Your employer has the option to report taxable noncash fringe benefits by using either of the following rules. The special accounting period rule: For example, each year your employer reports the value of benefits provided during the last 2 months of the prior year and the first 10 months of the current year. You must use the same accounting period that you use to report the benefit to claim an employee business deduction for example, use of a car.

Your employer must include all taxable fringe benefits in box 1 of Form W-2 as wages, tips and other compensation and, if applicable, in boxes 3 and 5 as social security and Medicare wages. Although not required, your employer may include the total value of fringe benefits in box 14 or on a separate statement.

Benefits you receive from the plan may be taxable, as explained, later, under Sickness and Injury Benefits. For information on the items covered in this section, other than Long-term care coverage , see Pub.

However, contributions made through a flexible spending or similar arrangement such as a cafeteria plan must be included in your income. This amount will be reported as wages in box 1 of your Form W Their total will be reported in box 12 of Form W-2, with code R. You must report this amount on Form File the form with your return.

If you are an eligible individual, you and any other person, including your employer or a family member, can make contributions to your HSA. Contributions, other than employer contributions, are deductible on your return whether or not you itemize deductions.

Distributions not used for qualified medical expenses are included in your income. Contributions by a partnership to a partner's HSA for services rendered are treated as guaranteed payments that are includible in the partner's gross income.

In both situations, the partner can deduct the contribution made to the partner's HSA. The shareholder-employee can deduct the contribution made to the shareholder-employee's HSA. You may be able to exclude from your income amounts paid or expenses incurred by your employer for qualified adoption expenses in connection with your adoption of an eligible child.

See the Instructions for Form , for more information. Adoption benefits are reported by your employer in box 12 of Form W-2, with code T. They also are included as social security and Medicare wages in boxes 3 and 5. The gym must be used primarily by employees, their spouses, and their dependent children. If your employer pays for a fitness program provided to you at an off-site resort hotel or athletic club, the value of the program is included in your compensation.

Also see Employee Discounts , later. However, if your employer gives you cash, a gift certificate, or a similar item that you can easily exchange for cash, you include the value of that gift as extra salary or wages regardless of the amount involved. If your employer provides dependent care benefits under a qualified plan, you may be able to exclude these benefits from your income.

Dependent care benefits include:. Amounts your employer pays directly to either you or your care provider for the care of your qualifying person while you work, and.

Your employer must show the total amount of dependent care benefits provided to you during the year under a qualified plan in box 10 of your Form W See the Instructions for Form for more information. For more information, see Pub. If your employer sells you property or services at a discount, you may be able to exclude the amount of the discount from your income.

The exclusion applies to discounts on property or services offered to customers in the ordinary course of the line of business in which you work. The exclusion is limited to the price charged nonemployee customers multiplied by the following percentage. For a discount on property, your employer's gross profit percentage gross profit divided by gross sales on all property sold during the employer's previous tax year.

Ask your employer for this percentage. Financial counseling fees paid for you by your employer are included in your income and must be reported as part of wages. Qualified retirement planning services paid for you by your employer may be excluded from your income.

For more information, see Retirement Planning Services , later. For exceptions to this rule, see Entire cost excluded , and Entire cost taxed , later. Also, it is shown separately in box 12 with code C. This insurance is term life insurance protection insurance for a fixed period of time that: Provides an amount of insurance to each employee based on a formula that prevents individual selection.

If your group-term life insurance policy includes permanent benefits, such as a paid-up or cash surrender value, you must include in your income, as wages, the cost of the permanent benefits minus the amount you pay for them. Your employer should be able to tell you the amount to include in your income.

Box 12 also will show the amount of uncollected social security and Medicare taxes on the excess coverage, with codes M and N. You must pay these taxes with your income tax return. Include them on line 62, Form , and follow the instructions for line For more information, see the Instructions for Form You must figure how much to include in your income. Reduce the amount you figure by any amount reported with code C in box 12 of your Forms W-2, add the result to the wages reported in box 1, and report the total on your return.

Use the following worksheet to figure the amount to include in your income. If you pay any part of the cost of the insurance, your entire payment reduces, dollar for dollar, the amount you otherwise would include in your income.

Payments for coverage through a cafeteria plan, unless the payments are after-tax contributions, or. Payments for coverage not taxed to you because of the exceptions discussed later under Entire cost excluded.

You are 51 years old and work for employers A and B. Both employers provide group-term life insurance coverage for you for the entire year. You figure the amount to include in your income as follows. You must add it to the wages shown on your Forms W-2 and include the total on your return. You aren't taxed on the cost of group-term life insurance if any of the following circumstances apply.

You are permanently and totally disabled and have ended your employment. Your employer is the beneficiary of the policy for the entire period the insurance is in force during the tax year.

A charitable organization to which contributions are deductible is the only beneficiary of the policy for the entire period the insurance is in force during the tax year.

You aren't entitled to a deduction for a charitable contribution for naming a charitable organization as the beneficiary of your policy. You retired before January 2, , and were covered by the plan when you retired, or.

You reached age 55 before January 2, , and were employed by the employer or its predecessor in You are taxed on the entire cost of group-term life insurance if either of the following circumstances apply. The insurance is provided by your employer through a qualified employees' trust, such as a pension trust or a qualified annuity plan.

You are a key employee and your employer's plan discriminates in favor of key employees. You don't include in your income the value of meals and lodging provided to you and your family by your employer at no charge if the following conditions are met. A condition of your employment. You must accept it in order to be able to properly perform your duties. You also don't include in your income the value of meals or meal money that qualifies as a minimal fringe benefit.

See Minimal Benefits , earlier. If you are an employee of an educational institution or an academic health center and you are provided with lodging that doesn't meet the three conditions given earlier, you still may not have to include the value of the lodging in income. However, the lodging must be qualified campus lodging, and you must pay an adequate rent. Its principal purpose or function is to provide medical or hospital care or medical education or research.

It receives payments for graduate medical education under the Social Security Act. One of its principal purposes or functions is to provide and teach basic and clinical medical science and research using its own faculty. Qualified campus lodging is lodging furnished to you, your spouse, or one of your dependents by, or on behalf of, the institution or center for use as a home. The lodging must be located on or near a campus of the educational institution or academic health center.

The amount of rent you pay for the year for qualified campus lodging is considered adequate if it is at least equal to the lesser of: The average of rentals paid by individuals other than employees or students for comparable lodging held for rent by the educational institution. If the amount you pay is less than the lesser of these amounts, you must include the difference in your income. The lodging must be appraised by an independent appraiser and the appraisal must be reviewed on an annual basis.

Carl Johnson, a sociology professor for State University, rents a home from the university that is qualified campus lodging. In most cases, if your employer pays for your moving expenses either directly or indirectly and the expenses would have been deductible if you paid them yourself, the value isn't included in your income. The value of services you receive from your employer for free, at cost, or for a reduced price isn't included in your income if your employer:. Offers the same service for sale to customers in the ordinary course of the line of business in which you work, and.

Does not have a substantial additional cost including any sales income given up to provide you with the service regardless of what you paid for the service.

In most cases, no-additional-cost services are excess capacity services, such as airline, bus, or train tickets, hotel rooms, and telephone services. You are employed as a flight attendant for a company that owns both an airline and a hotel chain.

Your employer allows you to take personal flights if there is an unoccupied seat and stay in any one of their hotels if there is an unoccupied room at no cost to you. The value of the personal flight isn't included in your income. However, the value of the hotel room is included in your income because you don't work in the hotel business. If your employer has a qualified retirement plan, qualified retirement planning services provided to you and your spouse by your employer aren't included in your income.

Qualified services include retirement planning advice, information about your employer's retirement plan, and information about how the plan may fit into your overall individual retirement income plan. You can't exclude the value of any tax preparation, accounting, legal, or brokerage services provided by your employer. Also, see Financial Counseling Fees , earlier.

If your employer provides you with a qualified transportation fringe benefit, it can be excluded from your income, up to certain limits. A qualified transportation fringe benefit is:. Cash reimbursement by your employer for these expenses under a bona fide reimbursement arrangement is also excludable. However, cash reimbursement for a transit pass is excludable only if a voucher or similar item that can be exchanged only for a transit pass isn't readily available for direct distribution to you.

You can't exclude from your income any qualified bicycle commuting reimbursement if you can choose between reimbursement and compensation that is otherwise includible in your income. If the benefits have a value that is more than these limits, the excess must be included in your income. This is a highway vehicle that seats at least six adults not including the driver. On trips during which employees occupy at least half of the vehicle's adult seating capacity not including the driver.

This is any pass, token, farecard, voucher, or similar item entitling a person to ride mass transit whether public or private free or at a reduced rate or to ride in a commuter highway vehicle operated by a person in the business of transporting persons for compensation.

This is parking provided to an employee at or near the employer's place of business. It also includes parking provided on or near a location from which the employee commutes to work by mass transit, in a commuter highway vehicle, or by carpool. It doesn't include parking at or near the employee's home. This is reimbursement based on the number of qualified bicycle commuting months for the year. A qualified bicycle commuting month is any month you use the bicycle regularly for a substantial portion of the travel between your home and place of employment and you don't receive any of the other qualified transportation fringe benefits.

The reimbursement can be for expenses you incurred during the year for the purchase of a bicycle and bicycle improvements, repair, and storage. You can exclude a qualified tuition reduction from your income. This is the amount of a reduction in tuition:. For education below graduate level furnished by an educational institution to an employee, former employee who retired or became disabled, or his or her spouse and dependent children. For education furnished to a graduate student at an educational institution if the graduate student is engaged in teaching or research activities for that institution.

If your employer provides you with a product or service and the cost of it would have been allowable as a business or depreciation deduction if you paid for it yourself, the cost isn't included in your income.

You work as an engineer and your employer provides you with a subscription to an engineering trade magazine. The cost of the subscription isn't included in your income because the cost would have been allowable to you as a business deduction if you had paid for the subscription yourself.

If a fringe benefit is included in your income, the amount included is generally its value determined under the general valuation rule or under the special valuation rules.

For an exception, see Group-Term Life Insurance , earlier. You must include in your income the amount by which the fair market value of the fringe benefit is more than the sum of: If you pay fair market value for a fringe benefit, no amount is included in your income.

The fair market value of a fringe benefit is determined by all the facts and circumstances. It is the amount you would have to pay a third party to buy or lease the benefit. This is determined without regard to: If your employer provides a car or other highway motor vehicle to you, your personal use of the car is usually a taxable noncash fringe benefit. Under the general valuation rules, the value of an employer-provided vehicle is the amount you would have to pay a third party to lease the same or a similar vehicle on the same or comparable terms in the same geographic area where you use the vehicle.

An example of a comparable lease term is the amount of time the vehicle is available for your use, such as a 1-year period. The value can't be determined by multiplying a cents-per-mile rate times the number of miles driven unless you prove the vehicle could have been leased on a cents-per-mile basis.

Under the general valuation rules, if your flight on an employer-provided piloted aircraft is primarily personal and you control the use of the aircraft for the flight, the value is the amount it would cost to charter the flight from a third party. If there is more than one employee on the flight, the cost to charter the aircraft must be divided among those employees.

The division must be based on all the facts, including which employee or employees control the use of the aircraft. You generally can use a special valuation rule for a fringe benefit only if your employer uses the rule. If your employer uses a special valuation rule, you can't use a different special rule to value that benefit. You always can use the general valuation rule discussed earlier, based on facts and circumstances, even if your employer uses a special rule.

If you and your employer use a special valuation rule, you must include in your income the amount your employer determines under the special rule minus the sum of: For information on the noncommercial flight and commercial flight valuation rules, see sections 1. Your employer's contributions to a qualified retirement plan for you aren't included in income at the time contributed.

Your employer can tell you whether your retirement plan is qualified. However, the cost of life insurance coverage included in the plan may have to be included.

If your employer pays into a nonqualified plan for you, you generally must include the contributions in your income as wages for the tax year in which the contributions are made.

However, if your interest in the plan isn't transferable or is subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture you have a good chance of losing it at the time of the contribution, you don't have to include the value of your interest in your income until it is transferable or is no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture. For information on distributions from retirement plans, see Pub.

If you are covered by certain kinds of retirement plans, you can choose to have part of your compensation contributed by your employer to a retirement fund, rather than have it paid to you. The amount you set aside called an elective deferral is treated as an employer contribution to a qualified plan. An elective deferral, other than a designated Roth contribution discussed later , isn't included in wages subject to income tax at the time contributed.

However, it is included in wages subject to social security and Medicare taxes. Section c 18 D plans. But see Reporting by employer , later. Under a qualified automatic contribution arrangement, your employer can treat you as having elected to have a part of your compensation contributed to a section k plan.

You are to receive written notice of your rights and obligations under the qualified automatic contribution arrangement. The notice must explain: Your rights to elect not to have elective contributions made, or to have contributions made at a different percentage, and. How contributions made will be invested in the absence of any investment decision by you.

You must be given a reasonable period of time after receipt of the notice and before the first elective contribution is made to make an election with respect to the contributions. The specific plan limits for the plans listed in 4 through 7 , earlier, are discussed later.

Amounts deferred under specific plan limits are part of the overall limit on deferrals. Your employer or plan administrator should apply the proper annual limit when figuring your plan contributions. However, you are responsible for monitoring the total you defer to ensure that the deferrals aren't more than the overall limit. You may be allowed catch-up contributions additional elective deferrals if you are age 50 or older by the end of your tax year.

For more information about catch-up contributions to b plans, see chapter 6 of Pub. Section plans, see Limit for deferrals under section plans , later. However, if you have at least 15 years of service with a public school system, a hospital, a home health service agency, a health and welfare service agency, a church, or a convention or association of churches or associated organization , the limit on elective deferrals is increased by the least of the following amounts.

The additional pre-tax elective deferrals made in earlier years because of this rule, plus. The aggregate amount of designated Roth contributions permitted for prior tax years because of this rule, or. However, if you are within 3 years of normal retirement age, you may be allowed an increased limit if the plan allows it.

See Increased limit , later. This is the pay you received for the year from the employer who maintained the section plan. In most cases, it includes all the following payments. The value of any employer-provided qualified transportation fringe benefit defined under Transportation , earlier that isn't included in your income. Other amounts received cash or noncash for personal services you performed, including, but not limited to, the following items. Qualified cash or deferred arrangements section k plans that aren't included in your income.

Instead of using the amounts listed earlier to determine your includible compensation, your employer can use any of the following amounts. Your wages that are subject to social security withholding including elective deferrals. During any, or all, of the last 3 years ending before you reach normal retirement age under the plan, your plan may provide that your limit is the lesser of: The basic annual limit plus the amount of the basic limit not used in prior years only allowed if not using age 50 or over catch-up contributions.

You generally can have additional elective deferrals made to your governmental section plan if: No other elective deferrals can be made for you to the plan for the year because of limits or restrictions. However, if you are within 3 years of retirement age and your plan provides the increased limit, discussed earlier, that limit may be higher. Employers with section k and section b plans can create qualified Roth contribution programs so that you may elect to have part or all of your elective deferrals to the plan designated as after-tax Roth contributions.

Designated Roth contributions are treated as elective deferrals, except that they are included in income. Your retirement plan must maintain separate accounts and recordkeeping for the designated Roth contributions. Qualified distributions from a Roth plan aren't included in income.

In most cases, a distribution made before the end of the 5-tax-year period beginning with the first tax year for which you made a designated Roth contribution to the plan isn't a qualified distribution. Your employer generally shouldn't include elective deferrals in your wages in box 1 of Form W Instead, your employer should mark the Retirement plan checkbox in box 13 and show the total amount deferred in box Wages shown in box 1 of your Form W-2 shouldn't have been reduced for contributions you made to a section c 18 D retirement plan.

The amount you contributed should be identified with code H in box You may deduct the amount deferred subject to the limits that apply. Include your deduction in the total on Form , line Enter the amount and " c 18 D " on the dotted line next to line These contributions are elective deferrals but are included in your wages in box 1 of Form W Designated Roth contributions to a section k plan are reported using code AA in box 12, or, for section b plans, code BB in box If your deferrals exceed the limit, you must notify your plan by the date required by the plan.

If the plan permits, the excess amount will be distributed to you. If you participate in more than one plan, you can have the excess paid out of any of the plans that permit these distributions. You must notify each plan by the date required by that plan of the amount to be paid from that particular plan. The plan then must pay you the amount of the excess, along with any income earned on that amount, by April 18 of the following year.

You must include the excess deferral in your income for the year of the deferral unless you have an excess deferral of a designated Roth contribution. File Form to add the excess deferral amount to your wages on line 7.

If you don't take out the excess amount, you can't include it in the cost of the contract even though you included it in your income. Therefore, you are taxed twice on the excess deferral left in the plan—once when you contribute it, and again when you receive it as a distribution. If you take out the excess after the year of the deferral and you receive the corrective distribution by April 18 of the following year, don't include it in income again in the year you receive it.

If you receive it later, you must include it in income in both the year of the deferral and the year you receive it. Any income on the excess deferral taken out is taxable in the tax year in which you take it out. If you take out part of the excess deferral and the income on it, allocate the distribution proportionately between the excess deferral and the income. You should receive a Form R for the year in which the excess deferral is distributed to you.

Use the following rules to report a corrective distribution shown on Form R for If the distribution was for a excess deferral, your Form R should have the code 8 in box 7. Add the excess deferral amount to your wages on your tax return. If the distribution was for a excess deferral to a designated Roth account, your Form R should have code B in box 7. Do not add this amount to your wages on your return. If the distribution was for a excess deferral, your Form R should have the code P in box 7.

If you didn't add the excess deferral amount to your wages on your tax return, you must file an amended return on Form X. If you didn't receive the distribution by April 18, , you also must add it to your wages on your tax return. If the distribution was for the income earned on an excess deferral, your Form R should have the code 8 in box 7.

Add the income amount to your wages on your income tax return, regardless of when the excess deferral was made. Report a loss on a corrective distribution of an excess deferral in the year the excess amount reduced by the loss is distributed to you.

Include the loss as a negative amount on Form , line 21 and identify it as "Loss on Excess Deferral Distribution. Even though a corrective distribution of excess deferrals is reported on Form R, it isn't otherwise treated as a distribution from the plan. It can't be rolled over into another plan, and it isn't subject to the additional tax on early distributions.

If the total contributed to the plan is more than the amount allowed under the ADP test, the excess contributions must be either distributed to you or recharacterized as after-tax employee contributions by treating them as distributed to you and then contributed by you to the plan. You must include the excess contributions in your income as wages on Form , line 7. If you receive a corrective distribution of excess contributions and allocable income , it is included in your income in the year of the distribution.

The allocable income is the amount of gain or loss through the end of the plan year for which the contribution was made that is allocable to the excess contributions. You should receive a Form R for the year the excess contributions are distributed to you.

Add the distribution to your wages for that year. Even though a corrective distribution of excess contributions is reported on Form R, it isn't otherwise treated as a distribution from the plan. Under certain circumstances, contributions that exceed these limits excess annual additions may be corrected by a distribution of your elective deferrals or a return of your after-tax contributions and earnings from these contributions. A corrective payment of excess annual additions consisting of elective deferrals or earnings from your after-tax contributions is fully taxable in the year paid.

A corrective payment consisting of your after-tax contributions isn't taxable. If you received a corrective payment of excess annual additions, you should receive a separate Form R for the year of the payment with the code E in box 7. Report the total payment shown in box 1 of Form R on line 16a of Form or line 12a of Form A. Report the taxable amount shown in box 2a of Form R on line 16b of Form or line 12b of Form A.

Even though a corrective distribution of excess annual additions is reported on Form R, it isn't otherwise treated as a distribution from the plan. If you receive an option to buy or sell stock or other property as payment for your services, you may have income when you receive the option the grant , when you exercise the option use it to buy or sell the stock or other property , or when you sell or otherwise dispose of the option or property acquired through exercise of the option.

The timing, type, and amount of income inclusion depend on whether you receive a nonstatutory stock option or a statutory stock option. Your employer can tell you which kind of option you hold. If you are granted a nonstatutory stock option, you may have income when you receive the option.

The amount of income to include and the time to include it depend on whether the fair market value of the option can be readily determined.

The fair market value of an option can be readily determined if it is actively traded on an established market. The fair market value of an option that isn't traded on an established market can be readily determined only if all of the following conditions exist. The option or the property subject to the option isn't subject to any condition or restriction other than a condition to secure payment of the purchase price that has a significant effect on the fair market value of the option.

The fair market value of the option privilege can be readily determined. The option privilege for an option to buy is the opportunity to benefit during the option's exercise period from any increase in the value of property subject to the option without risking any capital.

For example, if during the exercise period the fair market value of stock subject to an option is greater than the option's exercise price, a profit may be realized by exercising the option and immediately selling the stock at its higher value.

The option privilege for an option to sell is the opportunity to benefit during the exercise period from a decrease in the value of the property subject to the option. For more information on the excise tax, see section If you receive a nonstatutory stock option that has a readily determinable fair market value at the time it is granted to you, the option is treated like other property received as compensation. See Restricted Property , later, for rules on how much income to include and when to include it.

However, the rule described in that discussion for choosing to include the value of property in your income for the year of the transfer doesn't apply to a nonstatutory option. If the fair market value of the option isn't readily determinable at the time it is granted to you even if it is determined later , you don't have income until you exercise or transfer the option.

When you exercise a nonstatutory stock option, the amount to include in your income depends on whether the option had a readily determinable value. When you exercise a nonstatutory stock option that had a readily determinable value at the time the option was granted, you don't have to include any amount in income.

When you exercise a nonstatutory stock option that didn't have a readily determinable value at the time the option was granted, the restricted property rules apply to the property received. The amount to include in your income is the difference between the amount you pay for the property and its fair market value when it becomes substantially vested.

If it isn't substantially vested at the time you exercise this nonstatutory stock option so that you may have to give the stock back , you don't have to include any amount in income. You include the difference in income when the option becomes substantially vested. For more information on restricted property, see Restricted Property , later. If you transfer a nonstatutory stock option without a readily determinable value in an arm's-length transaction to an unrelated person, you must include in your income the money or other property you received for the transfer, as if you had exercised the option.

If you transfer a nonstatutory stock option without a readily determinable value in a non-arm's-length transaction for example, a gift , the option isn't treated as exercised or closed at that time.

You must include in your income, as compensation, any money or property received. When the transferee exercises the option, you must include in your income, as compensation, the excess of the fair market value of the stock acquired by the transferee over the sum of the exercise price paid and any amount you included in income at the time you transferred the option.

At the time of the exercise, the transferee recognizes no income and has a basis in the stock acquired equal to the fair market value of the stock. Any transfer of this kind of option to a related person is treated as a non-arm's-length transaction. See Regulations section 1. Recourse note in satisfaction of the exercise price of an option. If you are an employee, and you issue a recourse note to your employer in satisfaction of the exercise price of an option to acquire your employer's stock, and your employer and you subsequently agree to reduce the stated principal amount of the note, you generally recognize compensation income at the time and in the amount of the reduction.

If you have income from the exercise of nonstatutory stock options, your employer should report the amount to you on Form W-2, box 12, code V. The employer should show the spread that is, the fair market value of stock over the exercise price of options granted to you for that stock from your exercise of the nonstatutory stock options.

Your employer should include this amount in boxes 1, 3 up to the social security wage base , and 5. Your employer should include this amount in box 14 if it is a railroad employer. If you are a nonemployee spouse and you exercise nonstatutory stock options you received incident to a divorce, the income is reported to you on Form MISC, in box 3. There are no special income rules for the sale of stock acquired through the exercise of a nonstatutory stock option.

Report the sale as explained in the Instructions for Schedule D Form , for the year of the sale. You may receive a Form B, reporting the sales proceeds.

Your basis in the property you acquire under the option is the amount you pay for it plus any amount you included in income upon grant or exercise of the option. Your holding period begins as of the date you acquired the option, if it had a readily determinable value, or as of the date you exercised or transferred the option, if it had no readily determinable value.

For options granted on or after January 1, , the basis information reported to you on Form B won't reflect any amount you included in income upon grant or exercise of the option. For options granted before January 1, , any basis information reported to you on Form B may or may not reflect any amount you included in income upon grant or exercise; therefore, the basis may need to be adjusted.

It is your responsibility to make any appropriate adjustments to the basis information reported on Form B by completing Form For either kind of option, you must be an employee of the company granting the option, or a related company, at all times during the period beginning on the date the option is granted and ending 3 months before the date you exercise the option for an incentive stock option, 1 year before if you are disabled.

Also, the option must be nontransferable except at death. If you don't meet the employment requirements, or you receive a transferable option, your option is a nonstatutory stock option. If you receive a statutory stock option, don't include any amount in your income when the option is granted. If you exercise a statutory stock option, don't include any amount in income when you exercise the option.

This means that, when your rights in the stock are transferable or no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture, you must include as an adjustment in figuring alternative minimum taxable income the amount by which the fair market value of the stock exceeds the option price.

Enter this adjustment on line 14 of Form However, no adjustment is required if you dispose of the stock in the same year you exercise the option.

See Restricted Property , later, for more information. Therefore, keep adequate records for both the AMT and regular tax so that you can figure your adjusted gain or loss. If you exercise an ISO during , you should receive Form , or a statement, from the corporation for each transfer made during The corporation must send or provide you with the form by February 1, Keep this information for your records. You have taxable income or a deductible loss when you sell the stock that you bought by exercising the option.

Your income or loss is the difference between the amount you paid for the stock the option price and the amount you receive when you sell it.

You generally treat this amount as capital gain or loss and report it as explained in the Instructions for Schedule D Form for the year of the sale. However, you may have ordinary income for the year that you sell or otherwise dispose of the stock in either of the following situations. You satisfy the conditions described under Option granted at a discount , under Employee stock purchase plan , later. Your employer or former employer should report the ordinary income to you as wages in box 1 of Form W-2, and you must report this ordinary income amount on Form , line 7.

If your employer or former employer doesn't provide you with a Form W-2, or if the Form W-2 doesn't include the ordinary income in box 1, you still must report the ordinary income as wages on Form , line 7, for the year of the sale or other disposition of the stock. You satisfy the holding period requirement if you don't sell the stock until the end of the later of the 1-year period after the stock was transferred to you or the 2-year period after the option was granted.

However, you are considered to satisfy the holding period requirement if you sold the stock to comply with conflict-of-interest requirements. Your holding period for the property you acquire when you exercise an option begins on the day after you exercise the option. If you sell stock acquired by exercising an ISO, you need to determine if you satisfied the holding period requirement.

If you sell stock acquired by exercising an ISO and satisfy the holding period requirement, your gain or loss from the sale is capital gain or loss. Report the sale as explained in the Instructions for Schedule D Form The basis of your stock is the amount you paid for the stock. If you sell stock acquired by exercising an ISO, don't satisfy the holding period requirement, and have a gain from the sale, the gain is ordinary income up to the amount by which the stock's fair market value when you exercised the option exceeded the option price.

Any excess gain is capital gain. If you have a loss from the sale, it is a capital loss and you don't have any ordinary income. Report the capital gain or loss as explained in the Instructions for Schedule D Form In determining capital gain or loss, your basis is the amount you paid when you exercised the option plus the amount reported as wages.

Although you held the stock for more than a year, less than 2 years had passed from the time you were granted the option. The rest of your gain is capital gain, figured as follows:. If you sold stock acquired by exercising an option granted under an employee stock purchase plan, you need to determine if you satisfied the holding period requirement. If you sold stock acquired by exercising an option granted under an employee stock purchase plan, and you satisfy the holding period requirement, determine your ordinary income as follows.

Your basis is equal to the option price at the time you exercised your option and acquired the stock. The timing and amount of pay period deductions don't affect your basis. XYZ Company has an employee stock purchase plan.

The option price is the lower of the stock price at the time the option is granted or at the time the option is exercised. A's holding period for all 12 shares begins the day after the option is exercised, even though the money used to purchase the shares was deducted from A's pay on 48 separate days.

The excess of the fair market value of the share at the time the option was granted over the option price, or. The excess of the fair market value of the share at the time of the disposition or death over the amount paid for the share under the option. For this purpose, if the option price wasn't fixed or determinable at the time the option was granted, the option price is figured as if the option had been exercised at the time it was granted.

If you have a loss from the sale, it is a capital loss, and you don't have any ordinary income. If you don't satisfy the holding period requirement, your ordinary income is the amount by which the stock's fair market value when you exercised the option exceeded the option price.

This ordinary income isn't limited to your gain from the sale of the stock. Increase your basis in the stock by the amount of this ordinary income.